• ADHD books published by NorthEast Books & Publishing, by Association for Youth, Children and Natural Psychology
  • ADHD books published by NorthEast Books & Publishing, by Association for Youth, Children and Natural Psychology



 

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  Overcoming ADHD Without Medication
by the AYCNP

How parents and educators can help children to overcome ADHD and childhood depression, naturally. Lifestyle changes, educational efforts can be very effective. Many professional and other resources listed. Extensive bibliography and index.


Answers to Questions Teachers Ask about Sensory Integration: Forms, Checklists, and Practical Tools for Teachers and Parents, by Jane Koomar, Carol Kranowitz, Stacey Szklut, Lynn Balzer-Martin, Elizabeth Haber, Deanna Iris Sava


Photo credit: child-computer
Image: Arvind Balaraman / FreeDigitalPhotos.net


Page updated November 20, 2015


Child Computer Use - Preschool Children - Less Computer Time
in Class Means More for Children


Less screen time, including computer time in preschool (and early childhood) classrooms benefits children


The following, (after the introductory comments by the AYCNP), was republished with permission from The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood (CCFC), a non-profit in Boston, MA in response to new policy statements from The National Association for the Education of Young Children concerning recommendations on computer use in early childhood settings, particularly preschool (or daycare).

The position of the CCFC is that the NAEYC and other agencies should more closely "support the public health community's recommendations of no screen time" for children under two and limited screen time for older children." Also, "Requiring children to spend time with screens in preschools will take time away from activities with proven benefits-like engaging in creative play or interacting with adults."

Some children can become addicted to the screen from preschool and kindergarten on. Often-times aggressive video games are a in-school preoccupation for some (public)grade school students.While there is some value in the balanced use of computers equipped with educational software, screen addiction for some children can start from preschool years onward.


The AYCNP notes that in inner-city schools of Newark, NJ, there is a certain subset of young children from preschool through all levels of early childhood into grammar school, who become addicted or compulsive to computer use in the early childhood and grade school classroom.

By the time children approach middle school years, usually around fifth grade, the predominant inclination of many pre-teen children in the public school classroom, and this includes a significant subset of children in early childhood, are inclined towards video games with no educational value, but which are aggressively oriented in one way or the other, more often than not involving shooting one thing or another, whether it be using serious virtual weapons or shooting parachuting penguins.

Many non-educational websites get around the filtering systems of public schools by labeling their non-educational games as "educational" or "math games," when in fact, the only math in the games is counting the points for every object you shoot or destroy.

The addictive and compulsive elements of the computer screen for some early childhood children, many of whom who do not have stable emotional attachments outside of school, leads educators to consider closely or reexamine the position, as noted by the CCFC, of restricting screen time on the computer to children out of the early childhood years. (Early childhood generally refers to pre-school through third grade).


The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood (CCFC)
Republished with permission


With preschoolers already spending an average of 32 hours per week with screens outside of classrooms, the last thing they need is mandatory screen time in school or daycare.

The National Association for the Education of Young Children has issued a draft of its new position statement on Technology in Early Childhood Programs. Because NAEYC is the nation's premier professional organization for early childhood educators, the statement will have a profound effect on young children's media use both in and out of classrooms.

NAEYC clearly put a lot of effort into crafting this statement, but the draft's recommendations are troubling. As it stands, the statement:

  • Undermines major public health efforts to reduce screen time in order to help curb childhood obesity and other child wellness problems. It does not support the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendation of no screen time for children under two and limited screen time for older children. In fact, reducing the amount of time children spend with screens isn't even a stated priority.
  • Prescribes that screen technologies should be included in all early childhood settings, regardless of the age of the children served or type of program. Even play-based and outdoor preschools will be expected to incorporate screens.
  • Provides no objective criteria or guidance to educators about whether or when to incorporate screens into their classrooms.
  • Does not address the growing problem of screen-based commercialism in preschools.
  • -- NAEYC's statement on Technology in Early Childhood Programs should support the public health community's recommendations of no screen time for children under two and limited screen time for older children. Instead, the current draft undermines national efforts to address childhood obesity and other wellness problems.

    -- The draft mandates all childcare and preschool programs include screen technologies. Yet there is no evidence in the research that having screen technology in an early childhood setting provides any comparative advantage to young children.

    -- Requiring children to spend time with screens in preschools will take time away from activities with proven benefits-like engaging in creative play or interacting with adults.

    -- It is irresponsible to advocate for the use of screen technologies without addressing the commercialism that is so rampant in screen media for children.

    As it stands, the statement on Technology in Early Childhood Programs is likely to increase both the time that children spend with screens and the amount of commercialism to which they are exposed.


    The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood

    NonProfit Center
    89 South St., #403
    Boston, MA 02111
    http://www.commercialfreechildhood.org