Marijuana Mental Effects | Clinical Study | Effect on Mind
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This page:

Marijuana use in the United States, how widespread? What are the effects of marijuana on the mind? How does marijuana use impact health? What are the uses of medical marijuana? What are the benefits and risks of medical marijuana?

See also:

Adolescent Psychology

The History of Opium

Selecting the Right Drug and Alcohol Rehab

Making a Success of Drug and Alcohol Rehab


Understanding Marijuana: A New Look at the Scientific Evidence, by Mitch Earleywine


The Science of Marijuana, by Leslie L. Iversen


Marijuana Myths Marijuana Facts: A Review Of The Scientific Evidence, by Lynn Zimmer, John P. Morgan


Cannabis And Young People: Reviewing the Evidence, by Richard Jenkins

Written for professionals and parents.


Page updated: December 8, 2012



Mental Effects of Heavy Use of Marijuana Use by Young Adolescents


The largest Harvard affiliated psychiatric hospital, Mclean Hospital in Belmont Massachusetts, considers the mental effects of heavy marijuana use on those who start at a young age.

The study, released on November 15, 2010, concludes that cognitive impairment and a host of related executive functions, are impaired. Early onset leads to 2x as great an incidence of heavy use (use more than three times per week), compared to those who started after 16 years of age.


 
Mental effects of heavy marijuana use include conginitive impairment, memory loss, inability to correct mistakes, loss of inhibition. Heavy users and early onset users (teenagers younger than 16 years old) are most affected.


Clinical Study on Mental Effects of Marijuana, McLean Hospital


Researchers at Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital have shown that those who start using marijuana at a young age are more impaired on tests of cognitive function than those who start smoking at a later age.

In a paper that will be presented on Monday, Nov. 15 at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in San Diego, Staci A. Gruber, PhD, reported that subjects who started using marijuana before age 16 made twice as many mistakes on tests of executive function, which includes planning, flexibility, abstract thinking and inhibiting inappropriate responses as those who began smoking after age 16.

"They performed significantly worse," said Gruber, director of the Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Core at McLean and assistant professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.


"We have to be clear about getting the message out that marijuana isn't really a benign substance. It has a direct effect on executive function."


The early-onset users also smoked three times as much marijuana per week and twice as often compared to the later-onset users, she noted.

"Our data suggest that the earlier you begin smoking, the more marijuana you smoke and the more frequently you smoke," she said. "That's an important finding."

Gruber said the findings are particularly critical today when legalization of marijuana is being considered in a number of states.

"We have to be clear about getting the message out that marijuana isn't really a benign substance," she said. "It has a direct effect on executive function. The earlier you begin using it, and the more you use of it, the more significant that effect."


Mental Effects of Early or Heavy Marijuana Use

Users who started using marijuana before the age of 16, were negatively affected in cognitive functions such as,

  • planning
  • flexibility
  • abstract thinking
  • inability to maintain focus
  • inhibiting inappropriate responses
  • the early a user begins, the more frequently they smoke later in life

"Habitual marijuana users made repeated errors
even when told that they were wrong."


The study included 33 chronic marijuana smokers and 26 control subjects who did not smoke marijuana. They were given a battery of neurocognitive tests assessing executive function, including the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, which involves sorting different cards based on a set of rules given. During the test, the rules are changed without warning and subjects must adjust their responses to the new rules.

The findings showed habitual marijuana users made repeated errors even when told that they were wrong. Users also had more trouble maintaining a set of rules, suggesting an inability to maintain focus. Early onset users and those who used the most marijuana had the most trouble with the test, making more than twice as many errors and fewer correct responses than later onset smokers.


"Users also had more trouble maintaining a set of rules,
suggesting an inability to maintain focus."


The researchers, who included Mary Kathryn Dahlgren, Kelly A. Sagar and Megan T. Racine, all of McLean Hospital's Brain Imaging Center also performed functional MRI (fMRI) scans on the subjects while they completed tests of cognitive control and inhibition.

Marijuana smokers showed increased brain activation in a frontal area of the anterior cingulate cortex, a key region for attention, inhibition and error processing, compared to control subjects. Interestingly, early onset smokers activated a different part of that brain region compared to later onset smokers, perhaps suggesting a neural change in response to marijuana exposure at an early age.


These findings underscore the importance of establishing effective strategies to decrease marijuana use, especially in younger populations.


"Our results provide further evidence that marijuana use has a direct effect on executive function and that both age of onset and magnitude of marijuana use can significantly influence cognitive processing," said Gruber.

"Given the prevalence of marijuana use in the United States, these findings underscore the importance of establishing effective strategies to decrease marijuana use, especially in younger populations," she said. "These findings are critical, as adolescence is a time of important brain development, and the adolescent brain is likely more vulnerable to the effects of drugs than the adult brain."


McLean Hospital, Massachusetts - Psychiatric - Harvard Affiliated

McLean Hospital is the largest psychiatric clinical care, teaching and research facility of Harvard Medical School, an affiliate of Massachusetts General Hospital and a member of Partners HealthCare. For more information about McLean Hospital, visit


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